Well I’ll be Damned

Government of the people; by the people; for the people.  Last nights vote indicated that two out of  three is no longer good enough.  The Tea Party started the chant.  That chant became Gregorian last night.

I watched old reruns on the X.3 channels early on.  Neither Barney Miller or Night Court, listed favorites for the days elections.  When the commercials hit, I’d surf the election.

My most dramatic finding for the evening was when I surfed by PBS.  Their pundits were doing some serious navel gazing.  Then Judy Woodruff said something to the effect that: Maybe it is time for us — the media — to review who and what we are.  That comment is why they are the only media outlet I respect.

When I started watching it was late but still early.  Clinton held a lead but the rest was impossible to ignore.  Most of the evening I watched WGN.  That surprised me.  I figured CBS and ABC and I did switch to them at times.  I even watched a bit of NBC for a laugh.  The reason I watched WGN was they had an honest, erudite, Republican political operative.  Not very often you can string honest-erudite-Republican together.  This was only person who was making sense of what happened.  They could turn his comments into a documentary.  When I tuned in, the Liberal two guest were still roasting his views.  By the end of the evening he had them entranced.  His name is Chris Robling and here he is on WGN Morning Show.

This morning it’s tatters and wreckage for both political parties. There is no way the rebuke could be stronger.  THE LEAST LIKED POLITICAL CANDIDATE IN PRESIDENTIAL HISTORY HAS LEVELED WHAT YESTERDAY SEEMED IMPOSSIBLE.  He ran against our current President.  He ran against his own party.  He was crass and distasteful and it didn’t matter.

Wisconsin put him over the top.  That’s a classic repudiation.  Even Minnesota remains in play this morning  — the only state Humphrey carried.  This was Robert LaFollete home turf.  LaFollete was a founding stalwart of the Progressive movement.

The truism is that Money owns politics.  Trump’s shoestring budget and fundraising axes that.  Instead we have a millionaire who resonated with blue color and middle American voters who both parties ignored.

I more than impressed with his acceptance speech last night.  It was rational and inclusive.   It was also late.  I would suggest you invest 15 minute in that speech.

If you still have shared doubts,  remember civics class; it is a tripartite government.

And check out another poker blog’s great look.

ADDENDUM:

Mike Pence was my governor.  For the last year, I saw political signs in many yards saying “Mike Pence   HE HAS TO GO”  and they succeeded but not the way they intended.

  1. November 9th, 2016 at 15:15 | #1

    I watched with surprise. I don’t care for either candidate, but was still intrigued as it played out. Will also be interesting to see what happens next.

  2. November 11th, 2016 at 04:39 | #2

    “Not very often you can string honest-erudite-Republican together.” I know at least one guy …

    I am interested in your take on Mike Pence. Perhaps a post on him from the perspective of an Indiana resident?

    Hubert Humphrey proudly carried 13 states and the District of Columbia. More importantly, my mother thought that he looked like her brother, George.

  3. November 11th, 2016 at 08:13 | #3

    Mike Pence is a controversial governor. He did some shoot footing on gay issues. “If I knew you were gay, I won’t bake your cake” and other issues. He more conservative and less Libertarian than his predecessor.

    For the last year, I saw plenty of signs in yards. They were mass produced saying “Pence must go.” He would have had a hard time with reelection. His fairly unknown Lt. Governor had an easy go at getting elected. Indiana has a super-majority in both houses. People from all walks have been pleased for the most part.

    I don’t agree with some of his position on individual rights but he is fiscally conservative and may influence Trump there. He was in the HoR in Washington and should be a help for his outsider boss.

    I think I was thinking Mondale and said Humphrey.

    P.S. Don’t consider myself a Republican. Not big on parties. I consider myself a libertarian but not a Libertarian.

  1. No trackbacks yet.